From the Editor

Welcome to Vol. 24-2, the eighth issue of the on-line Long Island History Journal. Our readers will find four articles and seven book reviews spanning Long Island history from the colonial period to the twentieth century.

Two of the articles focus upon the role of the Loyalists in the American Revolution: Christopher Minty offers a composite picture of these individuals in Suffolk County by studying the oaths taken in allegiance to the Crown. Matthew M. Montelione focuses on one such Loyalist, Richard Floyd IV, and the consequences of his allegiance to the monarchy.

Flushing during the colonial period is the subject of Lauren Brincat’s examination of this commercially successful Quaker settlement while Mary Laura Lamont shares with us eleven art works inspired by “Old Mastic,” that were part of a recent special exhibition at the William Floyd Estate.

Recently published books reviewed in this issue include Richard Welch’s biography of Setauket native Benjamin Tallmadge and his role in the Revolutionary War, an examination of the impact of the Civil War on Long Island by Harrison Hunt and Bill Bleyer, and a selection of excerpts from the diaries of a young Theodore Roosevelt before he achieved national prominence, edited by Edward P. Kohn.

Additionally, our readers will find reviews of Ellen NicKenzie Lawson’s study of smuggling on Long Island during the national experiment with prohibition in the 1920’s, Robert Mackay’s collection of studies of planned communities on Long Island stemming from the Progressive Era, Marilyn Weigand’s book looking at east end culture and history centering on Peconic Bay, and Natalie Naylor’s account of women in Long Island’s past.

Our next issue will highlight new research on the history of whaling on Long Island. This special issue will be edited by Jennifer Anderson, LIHJ Associate Editor, and our Guest Editor, Jenna Wallace Coplin, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology at the City University of New York. Jenna previously compiled a survey of African American historic sites, entitled, “Mapping African American History across Long Island” which appeared in the Long Island History Journal in 2013 (Vol. 23-2) and we are grateful for her time and expertise on this forthcoming issue.

Those seeking to submit an article are asked to click on the “Authors” tab on the homepage and view the drop-down “Guidelines for Authors.” LIHJ readers are encouraged to visit the “subscribe” link on our home page to enter a free subscription to our publication.

Charles Backfish,
Editor in Chief