2011, Volume 22, Issue 1

Contributors

Richard Acritelli is a social studies teacher at Rocky Point High School and an adjunct history professor at Suffolk Community College. He has previously published military history articles in the Long Island Historical Journal and the North Shore Sun.

Emanuel Boussios is a professor of sociology at the State University of New York’s Nassau Community College and a research consultant at Stony Brook University. Boussios completed his doctorate at Stony Brook University and his areas of research include war, terrorism, and presidential politics, all topics on which he has published extensively.

Athanassia Boussios is a Ph.D. candidate at Columbia University’s Teachers College in Mathematics Education. Her areas of interest include comparative education and curriculum reform, and her research could have a substantial impact on the educational reform movement in Greece and its neighboring European countries.

Jeffrey A. Kroessler is an associate professor in the Lloyd Sealy Library at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. His publications include The Greater New York Sports Chronology (2010) and contributions to the Encyclopedia of New York State (2005) and Robert Moses and the Modern City (2007).

Allison Manfra McGovern is a professional archaeologist and a doctoral student in anthropology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her dissertation research focuses on an historic-period Montaukett village site, called Indian Fields, in Montauk.

Joshua Ruff is Curator of History and Carriages at the Long Island Museum, Senior Lecturer of History at St. Joseph’s College, and Associate Editor of the Long Island History Journal. Mr. Ruff’s publications include articles for The Magazine Antiques, American History, and the LIHJ.

Stephen N. Sanfilippo has taught United States History at both the high school and college levels. He is also a researcher and performer of historic music. His Ph.D. in history is from Stony Brook University where his dissertation was titled “Whalemen’s Song: Lyrics and Masculinity in the Sag Harbor Whalefishery, 1840-1850.”