Johnson, Review on Mary L. Booth

Suzanne Johnson on Tricia Foley, Mary L. Booth: The Story of an Extraordinary 19th-Century Woman (2018). 239 p. Illustrations.  $44.99. Available from amazon.com. ISBN 9781986346245 In every town on Long Island, there’s at least one old house, set close to the road, maybe with overgrown vegetation, and looking a bit neglected.  Some of these old […]

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Johnson Review, Long Island Beaches

Suzanne Johnson on Kristen J. Nyitray. Long Island Beaches (Postcard History Series). Charleston, SC:  Arcadia Publishing, 2019.  127 p.  Bibliography. ISBN:139781467103299, $21.99 At first glance, you might think, ‘why a book about Long Island’s beaches?’ This book is different. Not only a postcard history, it is nearly a guidebook to Long Island’s most attractive and […]

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2020 Vol 28-1

Articles Kelly Marino, We “protest the unjust treatment of pickets”: Brooklyn Suffragist Lucy Burns, Militancy in the National Woman’s Party, and Prison Reform, 1917–1920 [HTML]   Sandra Roff, A School of Their Own: Teacher Training in Brooklyn, New York [HTML]     Anne Sandford, The League of Women Voters of the Hamptons (LWVH): An Interpretive […]

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Ruff, Saving Fire Island from Robert Moses (Review)

Joshua Ruff on Christopher Verga, Saving Fire Island from Robert Moses: The Fight for a National Seashore (Charleston, SC: The History Press, 2019), 126 pp., Notes, Bibliography, Soft Cover $21.99. Soon after Robert Caro’s The Power Broker was published in 1974, 86-year-old Robert Moses wrote an extraordinary 23-page rebuttal to the Pulitzer Prize winning biography […]

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Osborne, Abandoned Long Island (Review)

  Daniel Osborne on Richard Panchyk, Abandoned Long Island (Dover: America Through Time, 2019), 96 pp., $18.99 Abandoned Long Island, by Richard Panchyk concerns itself with eleven different locations in both Nassau and Suffolk County, exploring structures and transportation routes that are still present, in one way or another, but no longer in use.  Some […]

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Grunder, Long Island State Hospitals (Review)

Sarah Lucinda Grunder on Joseph M. Galante, Images of America: Long Island State Hospitals (Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia Publishing, 2019), 128 pp. $21.99 By the 1950s, Long Island was at the center of mental health care in the United States, with more than 32,000 patients residing in three state institutions separated by only 11 miles. How […]

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Contributors (2020)

Sarah Lucinda Grunder is an associate professor of history and assistant academic chair forSocial Sciences at the Ammerman campus of Suffolk County Community College. Suzanne Johnson is a librarian, recently retired as the director of the Longwood Public Library in Middle Island. She and David Clemens, her predecessor as director, have just compiled a book […]

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We “protest the unjust treatment of pickets”: Brooklyn Suffragist Lucy Burns, Militancy in the National Woman’s Party, and Prison Reform, 1917–1920

By Kelly Marino From 1917 to 1919, the National Woman’s Party (NWP), a militant suffrage organization that campaigned for women’s right to vote in the United States during the Progressive Era, started dramatic demonstrations to promote their cause in Washington, DC. NWP co-leaders, Alice Paul, a New Jersey native, and Lucy Burns, an upper-class New […]

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Acknowledgements

The Long Island History Journal thanks the Long Island Council for the Social Studies (LICSS) for its continuous support. A special acknowledgment is due to Assemblyman Steve Englebright— a Stony Brook University colleague and staunch advocate of the University in general and strong friend and supporter of the Long Island History Journal in particular. The Center for […]

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Contributors

  Marian Mathison Desrosiers was an history educator of middle and high school students for thirty years and has been a professor at Salve Regina University for a dozen years. She was awarded Fulbright Fellowships to India and Russia. Her research for John Banister of Newport: The Life and Accounts of a Colonial Merchant (2017) […]

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Review of Books, Johnson and Clemens

Review of Books Charles G. Backfish on Suzanne Johnson and David Clemens, Camp Upton (Charleston: Arcadia Publishing, 2018), 128 pp., Index, Bibliography. $15.99. The overall story of Camp Upton in Yaphank as a soldier training facility has been known to some Long Islanders and has appeared with frequency in articles connected with the centennial of […]

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Review of Books, Sandford

Review of Books Tara Rider on Anne Sandford, Reluctant Reformer: Nathan Sanford in the Era of the Early Republic (Albany: SUNY Press, 2017), 216 pp., Index, Bibliography, Hardcover $29.95. President John Adams’ note to his son in which he says “I take it for granted that public Virtue is no longer to rule: but Ambition […]

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Friend of Government or Friend of Country: The Revolutionary War Journey of Thomas Banister from Rhode Island to Long Island

By Marian Desrosiers Mid-eighteenth-century colonial seaports generated a vibrant exchange of goods, services, and ideas. Newport, Rhode Island, for example, experienced a growth in population because the community provided jobs, schools, and religious toleration. However, Acts of the British Parliament during the 1760s interfered and restricted colonial trade. This changed the relationship between England and […]

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2019 Vol 27-1

Articles Marian Desrosiers, “Friend of Government or Friend of Country: The Revolutionary War Journey of Thomas Banister from Rhode Island to Long Island” [HTML] John A. Strong and Mary Laura Lamont, The Richard Floyd Account Book, 1719-1732: Insights into Changing Times in Colonial Brookhaven [HTML] Christopher Verga, The Battle for Long Islanders’ Souls and Minds: […]

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Acknowledgements

  The Long Island History Journal thanks the Long Island Council for the Social Studies (LICSS) for its continuous support. A special acknowledgment is due to Assemblyman Steve Englebright— a Stony Brook University colleague and staunch advocate of the University in general and strong friend and supporter of the Long Island History Journal in particular. The Center […]

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Long Island during Prohibition, 1920-1933

By Jonathan Olly Long Island changed an awful lot When Prohibition came. Some fine old standards went to pot When Prohibition came. Fishermen sailed away at night, Knowing the weather wasn’t right For any sort of fish to bite, When Prohibition came…. Paul Bailey, Suffolk County historian, 1962[1] One minute after midnight on January 17, […]

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Blockbusting on Long Island: The Case of Gerald Kutler and the 1962 Legal Battle against Real Estate Bias in North Bellport, New York

By Neil P. Buffett On November 1, 1962, Gerald Kutler, a real estate agent from Islip Terrace, had his realtor’s license revoked by the Department of State of New York.[1] After a series of public hearings were held in New York City, the Secretary of State’s Office found that, based upon witness testimony, Kutler’s practices […]

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Editorial Note

Welcome to Volume 26-1, the eleventh issue of the online Long Island History Journal, featuring three articles and two book reviews. Two of our articles examine changes in American society stemming from the “Progressive era” of the early twentieth century: the success of the prohibition movement and the women’s suffrage movement, both reflected in the […]

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Review of Books, Fitzpatrick

Review of Books Suzanne Johnson on Kevin C. Fitzpatrick,World War I New York: A Guide to the City’s Enduring Ties to the Great War (Guilford, CT: Globe Pequot Press, 2017), 189 pp., index, bibliography. $16.95. Also available as an ebook. As the nation commemorated the 100th anniversary of the U.S. entry into World War I […]

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Review of Books, Swanson and Bowman

Tara Rider on R. Lawrence Swanson and Malcolm J. Bowman, Between Stony Brook Harbor Tides: The Natural History of a Long Island Pocket Bay (Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 2016). Between Stony Brook Harbor Tides, by R. Lawrence Swanson and Malcolm J. Bowman, investigates the historical and ecological significance this harbor […]

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Annie Rensselaer Tinker (1884-1924) of East Setauket and NYC: Philanthropist, Suffragist, WWI Volunteer in Europe

By Catherine Tinker Annie Rensselaer Tinker, Philanthropist[1] Annie Rensselaer Tinker was an independent thinker, an advocate for women, an equestrian, and a self-described “spinster.” At the outbreak of World War I in 1914, a newspaper chronicled how “Miss Annie Tinker, daughter of Henry C. Tinker, former president of the Liberty National Bank, of New York, […]

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Contributors

Neil Buffett is currently an Assistant Professor of History at Suffolk County Community College. He earned his PhD in History from Stony Brook University in December, 2011. His research interests focus upon urban and suburban history, social movements, and high school student/teenaged political activism in the twentieth century United States. Suzanne Johnson is a librarian, […]

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2017 Vol 26-1

  Editorial Note [HTML] Articles Jonathan Olly, “Long Island during Prohibition, 1920-1933” [HTML] Catherine Tinker, “Annie Rensselaer Tinker (1884-1924) of East Setauket and NYC: Philanthropist, Suffragist, WWI Volunteer in Europe” [HTML] Neil P. Buffett, “Blockbusting on Long Island: The Case of Gerald Kutler and the 1962 Legal Battle against Real Estate Bias in North Bellport, […]

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